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Literacy Online. Every child literate - a shared responsibility.

Instructional Series

Welcome to the English medium literacy instructional series teaching and learning resources for years 1 to 8.

Example resources
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/content/search?SearchText=new zealand culture&SubTreeArray[]=22574&ColourWheelLevel=all&CurriculumLevel=all&ReadingYearLevel=all&LearningArea=all

Search results

154 items - Showing 11 - 20

  • Alvin and me cover image.

    Alvin and Me

    School journal level 3 May 2017 cover image.

    by Chris Tse

    illustrated by Peter Campbell

    "A week before Alvin arrived, I got summoned to the principal’s office. I was a good kid. I never got into trouble. I was sure I’d done nothing wrong. But still, I couldn’t help worrying..."

    Series: School Journal Level 3 May 2017

    Curriculum level: 3

    Reading year level: 5

    Category: Non-fiction

    Topics: Cantonese, change, Chinese New Zealanders, culture, difference, embarrassment, ethnic diversity, friendship, heritage, identity, individuality, race, relationships, respect, responsibility

    In: School Journal Level 3 May 2017

    Publication date: May 2017

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  • The Kōrero of the Waka.

    The Kōrero of the Waka

    by Keri Welham

    Te Waka Rangimārie o Kaiwaka is a 25-metre waka at the entrance to Kaiwaka School in Northland. The waka welcomes people to the school and is also enjoyed as a kapa haka platform, a play area, and a quiet place to sit. The focus of this article is on the whakairo (carvings) of the waka, which tell stories about the Kaiwaka area and the school community. The article includes a profile of carver Tim Codyre, who speaks of the rich and changing traditions of whakairo.

    Series: School Journal Level 2 November 2020

    Learning area: English, The Arts, Social Sciences

    Curriculum level: 2

    Reading year level: 4

    Category: Non-fiction

    Related titles: See TSM

    Topics: Aotearoa New Zealand’s histories, carving, change, culture, heritage, history, Kaipara Harbour, Kaiwaka, school, stories, taonga, Tim Codyre, waka, waka tāngata, wellbeing, whakairo

    In: School Journal Level 2 November 2020

    Publication date: November 2020

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  • New zealand's weather cover image.

    New Zealand's Weather

    by Eric Brenstrum

    This article outlines the global influences on the weather. It explores how oceans, continents, and icecaps affect the way air moves, heats, and cools. It then reinforces the concepts explained in “What Makes the Weather” by applying them to the context of weather in the South Pacific and particularly in New Zealand.

    Series: Connected 2012 Level 3 - Watching the Weather

    Learning area: English, Science

    Curriculum level: 3

    Category: Non-fiction

    Strand: Nature of science, Planet Earth and beyond, Physical world, Material world

    In: Connected 2012 Level 3 - Watching the Weather

    Publication date: January 2012

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  • Book cover.

    Puawai Cairns: Te Papa Detective

    School Journal L3 Nov 2016

    by Whiti Hereaka

    This article describes the work of Puawai Cairns, a curator at Te Papa Tongarewa. Puawai believes that as a curator, her job is to tell stories about people: “Each one always begins with a taonga.”

    Series: School Journal Level 3 November 2016

    Learning area: English, Social Sciences

    Curriculum level: 3

    Reading year level: 6

    Category: Non-fiction

    Related titles: Listed in TSM

    Topics: artefacts, change, culture, curator, detection, history, museums, New Zealand Wars, niu, Pai Mārire, past, stories, taonga, Te Papa Tongarewa, tikanga Māori

    In: School Journal Level 3 November 2016

    Publication date: November 2016

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  • Nian the New Year Monster cover

    Nian, the New Year Monster

    A Chinese tale, retold by Chris Tse

    This story sets out to explain the origin of the Chinese New Year festival. It tells how a mysterious old man helps a village to get rid of Nian, a rampaging monster who has been terrorising the villagers at the start of every spring (on the first day of the Chinese New Year). The story is told in the style of a traditional folk tale, but its origins are thought to be more recent.

    Purple 2 

    Series: Junior Journal 59, Level 2, 2019

    Learning area: English, The Arts

    Colour wheel level: Purple

    Curriculum level: 2

    Reading year level: 3

    Category: Fiction

    Related titles: See TSM

    Topics: celebration, China, Chinese New Year, cooperation, courage, culture, fireworks, helping others, monster, Nian, New Year, problem solving, tradition, traditional tale

    In: Junior Journal 59, Level 2, 2019

    Publication date: November 2019

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  • Wētā Went Walking

    Wētā Went Walking

    written by Kay Hancock

    illustrated by Fraser Williamson

    When Wētā goes walking in the bush, Rat decides to go hunting ... Will Wētā be safe? Does he know Rat is following him?

    This dramatic, open-ended story is ideal for fostering students’ enthusiasm and confidence as readers. The rhythmic, repetitive language encourages and supports students to read along with the teacher, even from their first day of school.

    #LFH

    Series: Ready to Read Colour Wheel

    Learning area: Science

    Curriculum level: 1

    Category: Fiction

    Shared texts

    Related titles: Shared books that are particularly suitable for students from school entry: Bubbles; Dad’s Snore; Fantail, Fantail; Greedy Cat; I’m the King of the Mountain; Monster’s Lunch; T-Shirts Texts about New Zealand bush creatures: “Clickety-clack Cicada”, “Just a Touch”; Fantail, Fantail and How Kiwi Saved the Forest (shared); Old Tuatara (Magenta); In the Bush (Red 3) Shared non-fiction texts about New Zealand creatures: Stick Insects, Camouflage, New Zealand Birds

    Publication date: April 2019

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  • Dinosaur hunter cover.

    The Dinosaur Hunter

    L3 cover image sept2012.

    by Norman Bilbrough

    This article tells the story of a New Zealand woman who, like Mary Anning (see “Mary Anning: Fossil Hunter”), had a great curiosity about rocks and the fossils in them. The article continues the theme of change over time. 

    Series: School Journal Level 3, September 2012

    Learning area: Science

    Curriculum level: 3

    Reading year level: 5

    Category: Non-fiction

    Related titles: Listed in TSM

    Topics: New Zealand, curiosity, rocks, fossils, change, time

    In: School Journal Level 3, September 2012

    Publication date: September 2012

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  • Te namu cover.

    Te Namu – the Nuisance Fly

    L2 cover image may2012.

    by Ross Calman

    This article may look like a story at first glance, but the dramatic illustration helps to introduce an informative report on the sandfly – and the reason it is such a nuisance to humans. The report gives some facts about how humans in Aotearoa New Zealand managed problems with sandflies in earlier times. It then explains where sandflies are found, why they bite, their life cycle, the reason why their bites are itchy, and how to prevent bites. 

    Series: School Journal Level 2, May 2012

    Learning area: English, Science

    Curriculum level: 2

    Reading year level: 4

    Category: Non-fiction

    Related titles: Listed in TSM

    Topics: sandfly, nuisance, New Zealand, life cycle

    In: School Journal Level 2, May 2012

    Publication date: May 2012

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  • The Story of the Ventnor.

    The Story of the Ventnor

    by Kirsten Wong

    In 1902, thirteen lives were lost when the SS Ventnor sank off the Hokianga coast in Northland. The ship was carrying the carefully packaged bones of almost five hundred Chinese goldminers on their way home for burial. Despite immediate efforts to retrieve the bones, the ship and its precious cargo were lost. Over the following months, some of the bones washed up on Hokianga beaches. Most of these bones were collected and cared for by local iwi, with the stories of the shipwreck and the Chinese kōiwi passed down across generations of Māori. Over one hundred years later, some of the decendants of the goldminers discovered the fate of the bones and the kindness that iwi had shown and travelled north to learn more. A shared respect for the ancestors has since drawn together Chinese New Zealand communities and the iwi who are now kaitiaki of the goldminers’ remains.

    Series: School Journal Level 3 May 2021

    Learning area: English, Social Sciences

    Curriculum level: 3

    Reading year level: 5

    Category: Non-fiction

    Related titles: See TSM

    Topics: ancestors, Aotearoa New Zealand’s histories, bones, ceremony, Cheong Shing Tong, Chinese, Choie Sew Hoy, commemoration, culture, family, gold, goldminer, healing, history, Hokianga, home, kōiwi, memorial, peace, remembering, repatriation, respect, shipwreck, Te Hoko Keha, Te Rarawa, Te Roroa, Te Tao Maui, Ventnor, waharoa

    In: School Journal Level 3 May 2021

    Publication date: May 2021

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  • Kei te Tāone Nui: Māori and the City (1945–1970)

    Kei te Tāone Nui: Māori and the City (1945–1970)

    by Samuel Denny, Caitlin Moffat-Young, and Aroha Harris

    The post-Second-World-War era in Aotearoa New Zealand saw one of the fastest rates of urban migration in the world, with Māori migrating to cities in large numbers to take advantage of new economic opportunities. The “golden city” offered much, but it came at a high price. Despite an unquestioned narrative in Pākehā communities that New Zealand’s race relations were world leading, Māori moving to the city encountered prejudice and discrimination at many levels. Māori responded to these challenges in multiple ways, for example, by establishing formal and informal groups that strengthened collective expression of Māori cultural values and practices. By gathering together to debate and take action on key issues, the seeds were sown for the modern Māori protest movement as well as the forging of a new urban Māori identity.

    Series: School Journal Level 4 May 2021

    Learning area: English, Social Sciences

    Curriculum level: 4

    Reading year level: 8

    Category: Non-fiction

    Related titles: See TSM

    Topics: 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, Aotearoa New Zealand’s histories, assimilation, belonging, change, choice, city, colonialism, community, culture, economics, employment, history, Hoani Waititi Marae, Hunn report, identity, integration, kura kaupapa, land rights, Māori, Māori Women’s Welfare League, migration, movement, opportunity, pepper-potting, protest, race relations, racism, social action, social change, te reo Māori, Treaty rights, urban marae, urbanisation, work

    In: School Journal Level 4 May 2021

    Publication date: May 2021

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